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Mon Sep 27 01:29:00 AEST 2021

insect



Biggest bugs - http://list25.com/25-biggest-bugs-that-will-freak-you-out/

看星星跳舞來找路 糞金龜比你會導航 - https://dq.yam.com/post.php?id=6056

earwigs - http://list25.com/25-facts-about-earwigs/

bed-bugs - https://list25.com/25-most-disturbing-facts-about-bed-bugs/

Bee -
https://www.zmescience.com[..]logy/incredible-pollinating-animals-bees https://www.zmescience.com[..]ence/bees-grasp-numerical-symbols-04234/

cockroaches - https://www.zmescience.com[..]ists-discover-cockroaches-good-survivors

How the jewel beetle’s shiny shell helps it hide in plain sight - https://www.zmescience.com[..]hiny-shell-helps-it-hide-in-plain-sight/

bedbugs - https://getpocket.com/explore/item/top-10-myths-about-bedbugs
Bugs aren’t just occasional nuisances, they’re crucial to the environment. Now populations of species worldwide are falling at alarming rates. - https://www.nationalgeographic.com[..]/where-have-all-the-insects-gone-feature

Photos from inside a tree reveal intimate lives of wild honeybees - https://www.nationalgeographic.com[..]ees-intimate-lives-inside-a-tree-feature

This beetle’s armour can survive being run over by a car. Here’s why it’s nearly indestructible - https://www.zmescience.com[..]car-heres-why-its-nearly-indestructible/

Honey bees use tool made of poop to repel giant hornet attacks - https://www.zmescience.com[..]/honey-bees-feces-hornet-attacks-094532/

Hundreds of new and unusual insects discovered in the Amazon’s canopy - https://www.nationalgeographic.com[..]-discovered-in-the-amazon-canopy-feature

Inside the Murky World of Butterfly Catchers - https://www.nationalgeographic.com[..]chers-collectors-indonesia-market-blumei

How scientists found 'Nemo,' Australia's newest dancing spider - https://www.nationalgeographic.com[..]nd-nemo-australias-newest-dancing-spider

喪屍螳螂會被跳水自殺 - https://www.thestandnews.com[..]2%AB%E8%B7%B3%E6%B0%B4%E8%87%AA%E6%AE%BA

These moths are doing something called “Batesian mimicry”. They’ve evolved to mimic the warning signals of a harmful species (in this case, wasps or bees) in an attempt to deter predators. They look like wasps to tell their predators that they can sting, although they can’t; they don’t even have any jaws or stinger. - https://www.zmescience.com/science/this-is-not-wasp/

As autumn approaches here’s why we see more spiders in our houses and why wasps are desperate for sugar - https://www.zmescience.com[..]s-and-why-wasps-are-desperate-for-sugar/


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